Swole Panda is pioneering a sustainable future by using bamboo for our clothing and accessories.
Species of bamboo equal to the height and width of a tree take as little as three years to mature completely
making it one of the most sustainable natural resources the planet has provided us.

With each purchase, you are part of the movement pioneering a more sustainable future.

British design, global sustainability.

Swole Panda is pioneering a sustainable future by using bamboo for our clothing and accessories.
Species of bamboo equal to the height and width of a tree take as little as three years to mature completely making it one of the most sustainable natural resources the planet has provided us.

With each purchase, you are part of the movement pioneering a more sustainable future.

British design, global sustainability.

Swole Panda is pioneering a sustainable future by using bamboo for our clothing and accessories.
Species of bamboo equal to the height and width of a tree take as little as three years to mature completely making it one of the most sustainable natural resources the planet has provided us.

With each purchase, you are part of the movement pioneering a more sustainable future.

British design, global sustainability.

Our Story

We have developed Swole Panda into a brand that’s proud to be British, ‘Sustainably British’! From humble beginnings out of our Sussex office we have grown into something true to its heritage and loyal to its customers, a philosophy we have always strived to follow.

The ideas behind our eco/British roots are that of our co-founder Oliver Slacke:

“Whilst studying Geography at Kings College London I was learning about sustainable development and the sheer impacts humans are having on the natural environment.

I wanted to create an accessories brand that would combine style with sustainability, minimising this impact .This led me to explore alternative resources where I came across bamboo.

Due to it’s huge environmental benefits and the benefits it has for you, it just made sense to make high end clothing and sunglasses out of this brilliant resource.

Thus, Swole Panda was born.”

Our Story

We have developed Swole Panda into a brand that’s proud to be British, ‘Sustainably British’! From humble beginnings out of our Sussex office we have grown into something true to its heritage and loyal to its customers, a philosophy we have always strived to follow.

The ideas behind our eco/British roots are that of our co-founder Oliver Slacke:

“Whilst studying Geography at Kings College London I was learning about sustainable development and the sheer impacts humans are having on the natural environment.

I wanted to create an accessories brand that would combine style with sustainability, minimising this impact .This led me to explore alternative resources where I came across bamboo.

Due to it’s huge environmental benefits and the benefits it has for you, it just made sense to make high end clothing and sunglasses out of this brilliant resource.

Thus, Swole Panda was born.”

Our Story

We have developed Swole Panda into a brand that’s proud to be British, ‘Sustainably British’! From humble beginnings out of our Sussex office we have grown into something true to its heritage and loyal to its customers, a philosophy we have always strived to follow.

The ideas behind our eco/British roots are that of our co-founder Oliver Slacke:

“Whilst studying Geography at Kings College London I was learning about sustainable development and the sheer impacts humans are having on the natural environment.

I wanted to create an accessories brand that would combine style with sustainability, minimising this impact .This led me to explore alternative resources where I came across bamboo.

Due to it’s huge environmental benefits and the benefits it has for you, it just made sense to make high end clothing and sunglasses out of this brilliant resource.

Thus, Swole Panda was born.”

Origins of the Bamboo

Back to the roots

James, the co-founder of Swole Panda, has researched and visited each tier of the process, right back to the source of the bamboo. Most brands don’t go past the fabric production stage. We will go beyond. We want our impact positive journey to affect our entire supply chain.

Bamboo forests

James started with a visit to one of the sustainably managed bamboo forests in China’s Jiangxi Province. The naturally occurring forests contain steep slopes which bamboo can comfortably grow on, maximising an otherwise unusable area.

It grows naturally and super-fast, with yields of up to 10 x higher than cotton for the same area without the need for pesticides.

Pulp production

The next step is turning the harvested bamboo into dried pulp which will then be sold onto the fibre producers. Very little is understood in the wider clothing industry about the processes involved this deep into the supply chain.

The factory James visited shares our environmental values, having invested heavily in waste-treatment technology. We now have the knowledge and transparency we need to make our impact positive ambition both possible and really meaningful.

Fiber production

Our biggest concern has always been the rumours about the management of the chemicals required to make bamboo pulp into bamboo lyocell and viscose fibre. We knew we had to find out the truth for ourselves. As we’d hoped, we found that our producers were taking their environmental responsibility seriously and working within safe limits.

Beyond our expectations, one had not only invested millions of dollars in waste-treatment but was committed to becoming a world-leader in sustainable bamboo viscose and lyocell production.

Clothing factories

Once the fibres have been knitted into fabric they’re transported to our garment factory. We’ve purposefully chosen to work with suppliers who share our values about treating people and the planet respectfully. We try to keep our supply base small and make the effort to build strong relationships and long-term partnerships with them.

We speak to them daily and visit in person as regularly as possible. We believe the best way to know what’s going on in your supply chain is to see it for yourself.

Back to the roots

James, the co-founder of Swole Panda, has researched and visited each tier of the process, right back to the source of the bamboo. Most brands don’t go past the fabric production stage. We will go beyond. We want our impact positive journey to affect our entire supply chain.

Bamboo forests

James started with a visit to one of the sustainably managed bamboo forests in China’s Jiangxi Province. The naturally occurring forests contain steep slopes which bamboo can comfortably grow on, maximising an otherwise unusable area.

It grows naturally and super-fast, with yields of up to 10 x higher than cotton for the same area without the need for pesticides.

Pulp production

The next step is turning the harvested bamboo into dried pulp which will then be sold onto the fibre producers. Very little is understood in the wider clothing industry about the processes involved this deep into the supply chain.

The factory James visited shares our environmental values, having invested heavily in waste-treatment technology. We now have the knowledge and transparency we need to make our impact positive ambition both possible and really meaningful.

Fiber production

Our biggest concern has always been the rumours about the management of the chemicals required to make bamboo pulp into bamboo lyocell and viscose fibre. We knew we had to find out the truth for ourselves. As we’d hoped, we found that our producers were taking their environmental responsibility seriously and working within safe limits.

Beyond our expectations, one had not only invested millions of dollars in waste-treatment but was committed to becoming a world-leader in sustainable bamboo viscose and lyocell production.

Clothing factories

Once the fibres have been knitted into fabric they’re transported to our garment factory. We’ve purposefully chosen to work with suppliers who share our values about treating people and the planet respectfully. We try to keep our supply base small and make the effort to build strong relationships and long-term partnerships with them.

We speak to them daily and visit in person as regularly as possible. We believe the best way to know what’s going on in your supply chain is to see it for yourself.

Back to the roots

James, the co-founder of Swole Panda, has researched and visited each tier of the process, right back to the source of the bamboo. Most brands don’t go past the fabric production stage. We will go beyond. We want our impact positive journey to affect our entire supply chain.

Bamboo forests

James started with a visit to one of the sustainably managed bamboo forests in China’s Jiangxi Province. The naturally occurring forests contain steep slopes which bamboo can comfortably grow on, maximising an otherwise unusable area.

It grows naturally and super-fast, with yields of up to 10 x higher than cotton for the same area without the need for pesticides.

Pulp production

The next step is turning the harvested bamboo into dried pulp which will then be sold onto the fibre producers. Very little is understood in the wider clothing industry about the processes involved this deep into the supply chain.

The factory James visited shares our environmental values, having invested heavily in waste-treatment technology. We now have the knowledge and transparency we need to make our impact positive ambition both possible and really meaningful.

Fiber production

Our biggest concern has always been the rumours about the management of the chemicals required to make bamboo pulp into bamboo lyocell and viscose fibre. We knew we had to find out the truth for ourselves. As we’d hoped, we found that our producers were taking their environmental responsibility seriously and working within safe limits.

Beyond our expectations, one had not only invested millions of dollars in waste-treatment but was committed to becoming a world-leader in sustainable bamboo viscose and lyocell production.

Clothing factories

Once the fibres have been knitted into fabric they’re transported to our garment factory. We’ve purposefully chosen to work with suppliers who share our values about treating people and the planet respectfully. We try to keep our supply base small and make the effort to build strong relationships and long-term partnerships with them.

We speak to them daily and visit in person as regularly as possible. We believe the best way to know what’s going on in your supply chain is to see it for yourself.

Back to the roots

James, the co-founder of Swole Panda, has researched and visited each tier of the process, right back to the source of the bamboo. Most brands don’t go past the fabric production stage. We will go beyond. We want our impact positive journey to affect our entire supply chain.

Bamboo forests

James started with a visit to one of the sustainably managed bamboo forests in China’s Jiangxi Province. The naturally occurring forests contain steep slopes which bamboo can comfortably grow on, maximising an otherwise unusable area.

It grows naturally and super-fast, with yields of up to 10 x higher than cotton for the same area without the need for pesticides.

Pulp production

The next step is turning the harvested bamboo into dried pulp which will then be sold onto the fibre producers. Very little is understood in the wider clothing industry about the processes involved this deep into the supply chain.

The factory James visited shares our environmental values, having invested heavily in waste-treatment technology. We now have the knowledge and transparency we need to make our impact positive ambition both possible and really meaningful.

Fiber production

Our biggest concern has always been the rumours about the management of the chemicals required to make bamboo pulp into bamboo lyocell and viscose fibre. We knew we had to find out the truth for ourselves. As we’d hoped, we found that our producers were taking their environmental responsibility seriously and working within safe limits.

Beyond our expectations, one had not only invested millions of dollars in waste-treatment but was committed to becoming a world-leader in sustainable bamboo viscose and lyocell production.

Clothing factories

Once the fibres have been knitted into fabric they’re transported to our garment factory. We’ve purposefully chosen to work with suppliers who share our values about treating people and the planet respectfully. We try to keep our supply base small and make the effort to build strong relationships and long-term partnerships with them.

We speak to them daily and visit in person as regularly as possible. We believe the best way to know what’s going on in your supply chain is to see it for yourself.